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Sport

13 June, 2023

Rowing ‘masters’ show how it’s done

The Tablelands Country Rowing Club has blown their competitors out of the water at the recent Australian Masters Championship Regatta.


Mixed quad of Karen Ross, Brian Kittler, David Blair and Harmina Balch from the Tablelands Country Rowing Club who missed out on a bronze medal by 0.3 of a second.
Mixed quad of Karen Ross, Brian Kittler, David Blair and Harmina Balch from the Tablelands Country Rowing Club who missed out on a bronze medal by 0.3 of a second.

The Tablelands Country Rowing Club has blown their competitors out of the water at the recent Australian Masters Championship Regatta held in Penrith, coming home with one bronze, two silver and one gold medal.

The club was established lakeside at Lake Tinaroo and currently has around 40 members, two of which are in their 80s.

For the championship regatta last week, the club took down 10 rowers who competed in a range of different divisions including women’s and men’s quads, women’s and men’s doubles, singles and mixed doubles and quads.

The team of master rowers competed on the same course used for the Olympics in 2000.

Due to their efforts, the rowers came away with medals in four different categories including bronze for the Women’s Quad (70 plus), silver for the Mixed Quad (80 plus) and mixed doubles (80 plus) as well as gold in a composite with Toowong Rowing Club Women’s 4.

Tablelands Country Rowing Club member Karen Ross said the championship was the club’s second time competing in a masters competition.

“Two members attended in Perth a few years ago, we have also had representation at a few Queensland masters over recent years,” she said.

“Tablelands have been competitive rowers in regattas in Townsville, JCU Rowing Club and Riverway Rowing Club, which are run twice a year.

“Previously, three members competed in the Masters in Paradise in Vanuatu and the head of the Brisbane River.

“Two members travelled to Hungary for the World Rowing Masters Regatta in 2019 and are now looking forward to competing in the same Regatta in South Africa in September.”

Masters rowing is categorised into ages, beginning with A – 27 years, B – 36 years, C – 43 years, D – 50 years, it then increases in five yearly increments up to 80 years (J) before continuing in three yearly increases to M (89 years or more).

Ross said rowing is a sport that isn’t restricted by ages and many rowers compete well into their later years.

“There are others who have taken up the sport in their 30s, 40s, 50s and even 70s and the club runs an eight week learn to row course and is open

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